Field Compaction Tips

Some tips from the University of Nebraska to consider for the rest of harvest since it looks like we’ll have wet weather. The full article is here¬†and is worth a few minutes of your time.

10 Tips to Avoid Compaction on Wet Soils at Harvest Time

  1. Wait until the soil dries enough to support the combine.
  2. Don’t use grain bin extensions or fill the combine as full.
  3. Use wide tires with lower inflation pressures.
  4. Keep trucks out of the field. Consider unloading at the ends of the field, not on the go.
  5. Grain cart should track the same rows as the combine.
  6. Don’t turn around in the middle of the field.
  7. Don’t fill the grain cart as full, unload more often.
  8. Establish a grain cart path and stay on it.
  9. Don’t till wet soils as they are easily compacted.
  10. Use cover crops to help build soil structure.

Thank You!

We at Hiser Seeds would like to thank all of our customers for a very successful, however challenging, spring! We hope that your experience was equally successful. We know there are plenty of options for seed in the area, so your continued business is truly appreciated.

Next year will bring a new combination of challenges, but as every year we’ll be ready to help you be as successful as possible.

Be on the look out for a date for our annual customer appreciation dinner. Time to start thinking about Wheat orders!

Replant Strategies

It was an interesting spring to say the least. A common concern this year dealt with replanting. Is it better to kill a field with a poor stand and start over, or try and plant the empty areas? Below is a link to an article in the C.O.R.N. Newsletter from OSU that covers some of the considerations to produce the highest yield. There are too many variables to ever find a silver bullet for replant situations, but it’s good to know that you always have options. One thing is for sure, we hope never have to count on this year’s experience again!

https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2017-19/yield-jeopardized-when-replants-result-excessive-stands